Parents often come to us worried about delays in their child's speech and language development, asking questions such as "is my child on track?".

To help with this, the below language developmental milestones are a great way for parents to monitor their child's language development and determine if their child is delayed. While progress can vary significantly, parents should be aware of these milestones as their child builds their language abilities, as deviation from these milestones may indicate a delay and need for speech/language therapy.

Age Milestone
0-3 months Smiles and interacts with others
4-7 months Babbling
7-12 months Uses gestures like waving and pointing
Recognizes name
Says 2-3 words other than "mama" an "dada"
Recognizes that words are symbols for objects
7-24 months Understands what others say
12-18 months Says a variety (10 to 20) of words
1-2 years Responds to single-step directions, such as bringing an object into the room
Identifies eyes, nose, and toes
Makes want known, such as using "more"
Makes "sounds" of familiar animals
1.5-2 years Puts words together to make sentences
2 years Says over 50 words
2-3 years Identifies body parts
Talks to toys
Asks "what's that?"
Uses negative phrases, such as "no want"
Forms plural endings, such as "books"
450 word vocabulary
Combines nouns and verbs, such as "I do"
Names common pictures and things
Plays and talks with other children
2.5-3 years Shows interest in books and drawing
3-4 years Can tell a story
Speaks in sentences of 4-5 words
4-5 years Uses past tense
Identifies shapes
Understands simple time concepts, such as "next" or "in the morning"
Asks many questions, such as "who?" and "why?"

*Adapted from ProEd - Inc.

The above table can be used as a guide to assess whether your child is within the typical developmental range for specific receptive and expressive language skills, or if your child may have a speech delay. While not all children meet these milestones at these exact times, the represented ages and skill sets are typical expectations for the average child. Development in line with milestones like these is one of the many areas our speech and language therapists will address with your child as part of our in-home screening and standardized evaluation processes.

If you are worried that your child is not meeting these developmental milestones and may have a speech delay, contact us to discuss your your concerns. We can quickly determine if your observations are something to simply continue to monitor, or if in-home, play-based speech therapy may benefit your child.